SEA-WEEDS, SHELLS and FOSSILS.

 

BY

 

PETER GRAY, A.B.S. Edin.;

AND

B. B. WOODWARD,

 

Of the British Museum (Natural History), South Kensington.

LONDON:
SWAN SONNENSCHEIN, Le BAS & LOWREY,
PATERNOSTER SQUARE.

  

Butler & Tanner,
The Selwood Printing Works
Frome, and London.

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All the marine Algæ contain iodine; and even before the value of that substance in glandular complaints had been ascertained, stems of a sea-weed were chewed as a remedy by the inhabitants of certain districts of South America where goître is prevalent. Chondrus crispus and (Gigartina) mamillosa constitute the Irish moss of commerce, which dissolves into a nutritious and delicate [Pg 5] jelly, and the restorative value of which in consumption doubtless depends in some degree on the presence of iodine. The freshwater Algæ not only furnish abundant and nourishing food to the fish and other animals living in ponds and streams, but by their action in the decomposition of carburetted hydrogen and other noxious gases purify the element in which they live, thus.......................

 

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