UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

FARMERS' BULLETIN

Contribution from the Bureau of Biological Survey, Henry W. Henshaw, Chief.

COTTONTAIL RABBITS IN RELATION TO TREES AND FARM CROPS.

By D. E. Lantz, Assistant Biologist.

Cottontail rabbits are so well known that little need be said of their habits. They breed several times each year during the warmer months, the litters averaging five or six young. The nest is usually placed in a hollow or depression of the ground, often in open fields or meadows. It is composed of dead grass and warmly lined with fur which the female pulls from her own body. The male rabbit takes no part in caring for the young, and the female weans them as soon as they are able to leave the nest. These animals breed so rapidly that in spite of many natural enemies, and of the fact that they are hunted for human food, they often become numerous enough to inflict serious losses on farmers and fruit growers in many parts of the.........................

 

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