STUDENT'S HAND-BOOK

OF

Mushrooms of America

EDIBLE AND POISONOUS.

BY
THOMAS TAYLOR, M. D.

AUTHOR OF FOOD PRODUCTS, ETC.

--------------------------------

 

FUNGI.

Botanists unite in describing the plants of this class as being destitute of chlorophyll and of starch. These plants assume an infinite variety of forms, and are propagated by spores which are individually so minute as to be scarcely perceptible to the naked eye. They are entirely cellular, and belong to the class Amphigens, which for the most part have no determinate axe, and develop in every direction, in contradistinction to the Acrogens, which develop from the summit, possessing an axe, leaves, vessels, etc.

Fungi are divided by systematists into two great classes:

  1. Sporifera, in which the spores are free, naked, or soon exposed.

  2. Sporidifera, in which the spores are not exposed, but instead are enclosed in minute cells or sacs, called asci.

These classes are again subdivided, according to the disposition of the spores and of the spore bearing surface, called the hymenium, into various families................................

 

Continue Reading Pdf. Student's Hand-book of Mushrooms of America, Edible and Poisonous