THE MOVEMENTS
AND HABITS OF
CLIMBING PLANTS.

By CHARLES DARWIN, F.R.S.

 

POPULAR EDITION

 

LONDON:
JOHN MURRAY, ALBEMARLE STREET.

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To ascertain more precisely what amount of movement each internode underwent, I kept a potted plant, during the night and day, in a well-warmed room to which I was confined by illness.  A long shoot projected beyond the upper end of the supporting stick, and was steadily revolving.  I then took a longer stick and tied up the shoot, so that only a very young internode, 1 of an inch in length, was left free.  This was so nearly upright that its revolution could not be easily observed; but it certainly moved, and the side of the internode which was at one time convex became concave, which, as we shall hereafter see, is a sure sign of the revolving movement.  I will assume that it made at least one revolution during the first twenty-four hours.  Early the next morning its position was marked, and it made a second revolution in 9 hrs.; during the latter part of this revolution it moved much quicker, and the third circle was performed in the evening in a little over 3 hrs.  As on the succeeding morning I found that the shoot revolved in 2 hrs. 45 m., it must have made during the night four revolutions, each at the average rate of a little over 3 hrs.  I should add that the temperature of the room varied only a little.  The shoot had now grown 3 inches in length, and carried at its extremity a young internode 1 inch in length, which showed slight changes in its curvature.  The next or ninth revolution ...............

 

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