GARDENING FOR THE MILLION

By

ALFRED PINK

It is with the object of stimulating the cultivation of gardens still more beautiful than those generally to be met with that the present volume has been written. It has not been thought necessary to repeat in each case the times when the seeds of the various flowers and plants are to be sown. A careful attention to the remarks made under the headings of "Annuals," "Biennials," "Perennials," and "Seed-Sowing" will supply all the information needed. That the work may prove useful to those at least who supervise their own gardens is the sincere wish of the author.

Abelia.—Very ornamental evergreen shrubs, bearing tubular, funnel-shaped flowers. They succeed in any ordinary soil if the situation is warm and sheltered, and are readily raised by cuttings. Height, 3 ft. to 4 ft.

Abies (Spruce Firs).—Among these ornamental conifers mention may be made of the beautiful Japanese Spruce Ajanensis, which grows freely in most soils and has dual-coloured leaves—dark green on the upper surface and silvery white underneath; this makes a grand single specimen anywhere. The White Spruce (Abies Alba Glauca) is a rapid grower, but while it is small makes a lovely show in the border; it prefers a moist situation. Of the slow-growing and dwarf varieties Gregorii is a favourite. The Caerulea, or Blue Spruce, is also very beautiful. Clanbrasiliana is a good lawn shrub, never exceeding 4 ft. in height. The Pigmy Spruce (A. Pygmea) is the smallest of all firs, only attaining the height of 1 ft. Any of these may be increased by cuttings...............

 

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