BEAUTIFUL FERNS.

FROM
ORIGINAL WATER-COLOR DRAWINGS AFTER NATURE,
By C. E. FAXON and J. H. EMERTON.

Descriptive Text by Daniel Cady Eaton,
PROFESSOR OF BOTANY IN YALE COLLEGE.

BOSTON:
ESTES AND LAURIAT.

The ostrich-fern is one of our finest ferns, being surpassed in grandeur only by Acrostichum aureum, Woodwardia radicans, and perhaps Osmunda regalis. The [023] plant is propagated chiefly by long and slender stolons, bearing appressed rudimentary stalk-bases. These stolons are said by Sachs to originate from buds formed on the stalks near the base: they run underground for several inches or a foot, and at the end rise to the surface and there thicken into a short erect caudex, covered by imbricating stalk-bases, and throwing up from the apex a grand vase-like circle of foliage, which is often higher than a manís head, and sometimes extends above his utmost reach.

The stalks are seldom over a foot long: they are flattened, blackish, and chaffy at the base, but above ground they are green, drying dull-brown, somewhat four-sided, and deeply channelled in front, when dried furrowed on the sides also. They contain two flattened fibro-vascular bundles. The stalks of the sterile fronds are rather longer than the others, but more rigid, and remain erect till the second year..............................

 

Continue Reading Pdf. Beautiful Ferns